Codes and Policies

The use of illicit drugs are harmful to all players.

The use of illicit drugs is harmful to our players.

The Rugby Australia Illicit Drugs Policy aims to prevent the use of illicit drugs and reduce drug related harm to participants and their families.

Its main objectives of the Illicit Drugs Policy are as follows:

  • Protecting the health and wellbeing of participants; 
  • Educating participants about the dangers of illicit drugs; 
  • Providing an avenue of rehabilitation for participants who have an issue with illicit drugs; 
  • Providing an effective deterrent to illicit drug use; 
  • Providing a positive example for young people and others in the community; and 
  • Protecting and promoting the image of Rugby which affects our clubs, sponsors and other stakeholders.

In addition to this policy, Rugby Australia has also adopted and implemented the Rugby AU Anti-Doping Code which conforms to the World Anti-Doping Code.

The World Anti-Doping Code Prohibited List includes illicit drugs which are prohibited ‘in-competition’ (match-day)

Illicit drugs such as cannabis, amphetamines, ecstasy, cocaine and heroin are dangerous and the use of them presents a serious risk to health. They are not subject to any quality controls, meaning that any person using illegal drugs will not know how strong the illicit drug is or what other substances may be contained within it.

As well as being dangerous to health, illicit drugs are also illegal. There are federal and state laws that carry serious penalties.

Furthermore, any criminal offence may result in disciplinary action under the Rugby Australia Code of Conduct or Rugby Australia Illicit Drugs Policy. 

Positive Choices

More information on drugs and the law can be found at Positive Choices.

The Positive Choices website also has educational resources such as fact sheets, videos, games and webinars aimed at parents, schools and young adults.

They offer easy to understand information on the different types of drugs, how to seek to protect yourself in social situations, and how to speak to a friend about their drug use.

The Department of Health has a number of useful educational resources that seek to increase awareness of the dangers of illicit drugs and the impact that they can have on individuals and the community.

Further educational resources and information on the dangers of illicit drug use can be found at Healthdirect Australia.

If you feel that you have a problem or know someone who may have a problem with illicit drugs, the first step to getting help is to start talking to someone you trust. More information on seeking help can be found here or the National Alcohol and Other Drug Hotline can be contacted on 1800 250 015.